After the Dawn

Page 3 sur 12 Précédent  1, 2, 3, 4 ... 10, 11, 12  Suivant

Voir le sujet précédent Voir le sujet suivant Aller en bas

Re: After the Dawn

Message  Renaud le Lun 1 Sep - 22:47

Au fait Pierre, cette nouvelle photo en tête du site c'est un beau spoiler non ? Smile

_________________
This will be my monument, this will be your beacon when I'm gone...

avatar
Renaud

Messages : 790
Date de naissance : 24/09/1964
Date d'inscription : 29/05/2014
Localisation : Rouen

Revenir en haut Aller en bas

Re: After the Dawn

Message  Pierre le Lun 1 Sep - 23:02

Renaud a écrit:Au fait Pierre, cette nouvelle photo en tête du site c'est un beau spoiler non ? Smile

Bah, j'y ai pensé, mais je crois qu'il n'y a que Ludo (je crois, plus les amis amosiens dont je ne me rappelle plus les dates) qui n'y sont pas encore allés, mais Ludo a déjà vu des photos si je me souviens bien... Et puis cette photo ne dit pas grand-chose, à part que KB est impériale, et magnifique (malgré les rondeurs, mais qui espérait revoir la sylphide des années 80?) et ça, tout le monde le sait déjà.... Wink . Même moi, ça ne m'aurait pas vraiment éclairé de voir cette photo avant le concert...

_________________
The sight of bridges and balloons makes calm canaries irritable

avatar
Pierre
Admin

Messages : 1385
Date de naissance : 30/08/1962
Date d'inscription : 29/05/2014
Localisation : Paris 14

Revenir en haut Aller en bas

Re: After the Dawn

Message  Pierre le Lun 1 Sep - 23:09

Emma a écrit:Le reste va suivre assez vite Wink

Peut-être un fichier de partage genre mediafire serait-il le moyen le plus simple de tout centraliser (et de préférence par mp, chacun choisit les photos de lui/elle qu'il veut diffuser... Par exemple, mon nu artistique avec les écureuils et les renards chez Alexis, ou dans le fauteuil d'Emmanuelle... Laughing , je n'ai pas trop envie... Encore moins celle ou je roule une pelle à Björk!)...

_________________
The sight of bridges and balloons makes calm canaries irritable

avatar
Pierre
Admin

Messages : 1385
Date de naissance : 30/08/1962
Date d'inscription : 29/05/2014
Localisation : Paris 14

Revenir en haut Aller en bas

Re: After the Dawn

Message  Alexis* le Lun 1 Sep - 23:22

Ahahahah lol!

avatar
Alexis*

Messages : 240
Date d'inscription : 31/05/2014

Revenir en haut Aller en bas

Re: After the Dawn

Message  alfontaine le Mar 2 Sep - 0:45


J'ai eu du mal à m'en remettre.
Je n'arrive pas à mettre des mots.... sur le concert évidemment. Pas sur les batifolages . Eh ben y en a qui ce sont amusés à Londres. Tant mieux Laughing
Bon je suis trop long et trop confus dans mes explications Very Happy Mieux vaut garder ça pour plus tard.
avatar
alfontaine

Messages : 324
Date de naissance : 02/10/1972
Date d'inscription : 01/06/2014
Localisation : Gard

Revenir en haut Aller en bas

Re: After the Dawn

Message  benjicoq le Mar 2 Sep - 11:09

batifolage?

sinon une sacré longue et bonne critique :
http://hiddentracks.org/articles/live-review/she-may-have-propelled-us-to-the-essence-of-our-connection-with-her-music-the-miraculous-ungraspable-nature-of-human-consciousness/

So this is where epiphanies happen, and few people are better placed to tell you about that than Kate Bush. On July 3rd 1973, she came here, to the Hammersmith Odeon, with her brothers to see David Bowie declare on stage that Ziggy was about to die and he was taking The Spiders From Mars with him. In that moment, she cried (as she later recalled, “it looked like he was crying too”) and the dramatic expiry of one pop star acted as the catalyst for another. Six years later, Bush concluded her Tour Of Life in Hammersmith. Between Ziggy’s swan song and what for the longest time people imagined to be her own live swan song, punk had happened, leaving seemingly little impression on Kate Bush. In truth, it had nothing to offer her.

Kate Bush’s love of Bowie had led her backwards to the beginnings of his fascination with mime, dance and conceptual theatre, locating Bowie’s dance teacher and mentor Lindsey Kemp in 1975 and hoofing up from her flat in Brockley to attend Kemp’s 50p open classes in Covent Garden. After two hours which had variously seen her pretending to be a magician, wearing a winged leotard and dressing as a World War II bomber, the final song of her final Hammersmith turn saw her rising through the fog in the guise of Catherine Earnshaw, singing Wuthering Heights into the one of the modified wire coathanger headsets – soon to become standard issue at gigs – that she had specially invented so that she could sing and dance at the same time.

Because, then as now, Kate Bush was the entire fruit bowl all at once. Mere singing could never communicate the tidal surge of creativity that overwhelmed her in the preceding years. As John Lydon (also quoted in this brilliant piece by Simon Price in The Quietus) pointed out, Kate Bush was “too much” for a lot of his friends. Kate Bush was clearly also “too much”, at times, for her record label, whose ambivalence about her relentlessly surprising musical left-turns remained a constant right up until she bitterly agreed to change the title of her 1985 song Deal With God to Running Up That Hill.

In the foyer of the Hammersmith Odeon before the third of Kate Bush’s first shows in 35 years, it’s hard to make generalisations. But I’ll allow myself this one about the guy next to me who, despite never having met me, keeps passing his binoculars to me so I can see what he’s seeing. And the male twentysomething fan who will brave the tube home dressed in a white cotton tunic, black tights, face painted in white and silver, his hair wreathed by leaves and twigs. And the woman who has gone to the trouble of having a dress made just like the one festooned with clouds on the sleeve of Never For Ever. And the woman who rushes from her seat during the encore of Cloudbusting to hand a bouquet of lilies to Bush (who, in turn, receives it between bows). “Too much” is why we came. There’s nothing more antithetical to Kate Bush’s music than sensory temperance. For three hours, it’s like finding out there was a Dolby switch pressed on your consciousness. The moment that Bush, draped in black and barefoot, marches in a soft, shuffling procession, flanked by her five backing singers, you turn it off. You might need it for the journey to work on Monday, but it’s of no use to you now.

She smiles beatifically throughout Lily – the invocation to guardian angels which originally appeared on The Red Shoes and, in 2011, The Director’s Cut – apart from when attacking the top notes, which she does with the phlegm-rattling zeal of a seasoned soul singer. The love in the room is unlike anything I’ve seen at a live show. Given free rein, it would surely result in an instant surge to the stage, but it’s tempered by a deference which extends to uniform acceptance of Bush’s stated no-cameras request. As a consequence, the first three songs are bookended by a total of six standing ovations. Hounds Of Love is exactly what it should be given the passage of three decades: drummer Omar Hakim and perma-grining percussion talisman Mino Cinelu hold back the rhythmic landslide, creating space for a vocal pitched closer to resignation than combativeness. Eighteen months ago, when Bush’s son Bertie McIntosh (then 15) finally persuaded her to return to live performance, the first two people she pencilled in for the project were the lighting designer Mark Henderson and Hakim. Within the opening section, it isn’t hard to see why Bush wanted to assemble her band around Hakim. Running Up That Hill is every bit as unyielding and startling as it was the very first time you heard it: doubly so for the incoming storm whipped up from the back of the stage. On King Of The Mountain, he reprises the freestyling pyrotechnics of his turn on Daft Punk’s Giorgio By Moroder. Everything about King Of The Mountain, in fact, is astonishing. Bush navigates her way around the song’s rising sense of portent with a mixture of fear and fascination that puts you in mind of professional storm chasers. When they’re not singing, her backing vocalists dance as if goading some unholy denouement into action, before finally Cinelu steps into a misty spotlight. On the end of a rope which he demonically twirls ever faster is some sort of primitive wooden cyclone simulator.

Perhaps the most remarkable thing of all is that this – King Of The Mountain and the preceding songs – is a preamble to the first act. In 1985, as Hounds Of Love was being readied for release, Kate Bush sketched out a putative film script for The Ninth Wave – the 30 minute suite of songs, which shared its title with Ivan Aivanovsky’s 1850 painting of a group castaways clinging to floating debris as dawn approaches. But, as she writes in the programme, “In many ways, it lends itself better to the medium of stage.” She’s referring to the conceit at the heart of The Ninth Wave and, yes, she’s right. What would have been impossibly confusing on film is only occasionally confusing when played out on stage. On a screen, we see the stranded protagonist in her lifejacket in palpable distress, relying on scenes from her past and future to keep her from slipping under. On stage we see those feverish visions played out before us. If Bush’s distress looks unsettlingly convincing on the screen, that might be because the 20ft deep tank at Pinewood Studios in which she had to be immersed for several hours pushed her to method actor extremes: singing live whilst gradually succumbing to a fever which was later diagnosed by her GP as “mild hypothermia.”

With the stage bathed in low blue light, Bush cuts a disembodied presence on screen, singing And Dream Of Sheep, all but unreachable to the singers who impassively assume the role of Greek chorus to her plight. What ensues is heartbreaking, frightening and funny, often at the same time. There’s the seismic din of a helicopter provided some huge piece of cuboid god-knows-what machinery which glides over the audience with searchlights blazing (the voice of its pilot supplied by Bush’s brother Paddy). There’s a blizzard of tissue-thin pieces of ochre paper bearing the excerpt from Tennyson’s The Holy Grail which is also featured on the sleeve of Hounds Of Love. There’s a deliberately mundane sitting-room exchange between her husband (Bob Harms) and son (McIntosh) about a burnt toad-in-the-hole to which she can only bear witness in ghost form (Watching You Watching Me). Then, of course, there are the fish people: skeletal fish-headed creatures that lurk elegantly around the action. That, in 2011, Bush called her record label Fish People – predating the first meetings about these shows by two years – suggests that these guys were probably present on Bush’s very first sketches for The Ninth Wave 30 years ago.

At times you imagine every prog-rock star who reluctantly had their wings clipped by punk feeling a sense of unalloyed vindication at the scenes being played out here. After the release of 2011’s 50 Words For Snow, I interviewed Kate Bush and asked her about recent musical inspirations. I figured that someone must surely have played her Joanna Newsom’s Ys whilst exclaiming, “Look! A kindred spirit!” (they hadn’t) But actually, she probably has no need of new input. It’s increasingly apparent that Bush’s musical hard drive was full by the time she made her first record. As Watching You Without Me modulates into Jig Of Life, I try and pin the musical sense of deja vu to an actual memory. Finally it comes to me. This sort of spectral somnambulant ceilidh was precisely the sort of thing which arty stoners in the early 70s – arty stoners such as Bush’s older brothers – would have sought out in the albums of Harvest Records outliers Third Ear Band. Except, of course, the one thing that Third Ear Band lacked was a cosmically attuned sensualist to act as a smiling Trojan horse to her own avant-garde sensibilities.* And so, here we are. A generation of pop fans suckered by Wuthering Heights, Wow and Babooshka. And we’re watching four people in fish heads wheel in a floating bit of rig illuminated by red flares. In a moment, she will climb aboard before the fish people claim her, carrying her aloft away from the sea, and among us through the aisle before, finally, The Morning Fog. This is perhaps as beautiful as anything we have seen up to this point. Dancers and singers take their partners. and, bathed in golden light, Bush exchanges glances with her fellow players. Everything you have seen in the preceding hour is the result of more than a year of drilled, deliberate meticulous planning. And yet, on the back of such vertiginous terrain, Bush gazes at her fellow performers with the relieved air of a trainee pilot who had to land a Boeing Airbus after the rest of the cabin crew had passed out.

It could end there. It really could. That was a whole show, right there. But on the other side of the intermission, it’s all change once again. Comprising the second half of 2005’s Aerial, A Sky Of Honey emerged from Bush’s fascination with the connection between light and birdsong and then, as she puts it: “Us, observing nature. Us, being there.” Without realising it, with those last three words, Bush may have propelled us to the essence of our connection with much of her most affecting music (The Sensual World, Breathing, Snowflake). The Ninth Wave is really about the miraculous, ungraspable nature of human consciousness. And, if the subtext – intended or otherwise – of that piece is that only we humans can reflect upon what it means to die, then the subtext of A Sky Of Honey is that only we humans can reflect upon what a gazillion-to-one miracle it is to be alive. Us, observing nature. Us, being there.

Up on stage, it’s left to Bush’s son – playing the part of the painter, a role assumed on the album recording by Rolf Harris) – to be that observer. But before all of that, it’s just Bush at the piano for the first time, encircled on the left hand of the stage by her band, with the right side left empty for the ensuing action. Controlled by its puppeteer, a black-clad Ben Thompson, a wooden artist’s model – perhaps the size of a ten year-old child – walks inquisitively around the stage during Prologue until finally it alights upon the singer. As Bush sings “What a lovely afternoon” and the drums come in, it appears startled. All the time, the backdrop shows birds in slow-motion, while the backing singers (increasingly, given what they have to do, “backing singers” doesn’t begin to cover what they have to do, but “chorus” is unhelpfully ambiguous) move gingerly around each other in painters’ garb. A slowly moving sky descends to fill the space on the right. The palette-wielding McIntosh dabs at the canvas with a brush, attracting the curiosity of the wooden model. “Piss off! I’m trying to work here,” he exclaims, while his mum – dressed in an Indian-style black and gold outfit – moves around him in slow motion.

If it’s surprising to see McIntosh rise to the challenges set before him so fearlessly – “A kind of ‘Pan’ figure” – it’s worth keeping in mind that he’s already the same age that his mum was when she started recording her first album. In a voice at least two octaves deeper than the one he used for Snowflake on 50 Words For Snow, Bush’s son bemoans his rain-splattered work on The Painter’s Link (“It’s raining/What has become of my painting?/All the colours are running”). But here, as on the record, there are no mistakes, just serendipity. The colours run and dusk magically materialises; the redemptive downpour brings all the musicians to the front for almost Balearic, flamenco-flecked stampede of Sunset. As a succession of joyous falsetto “Prrrrrraaah!!”s attest, the moments that see Bush at her most unguarded are the ones where she gets to commune with the twenty-odd players around her.

From hereon in, the Aerial segment of the show – co-directed, as is The Ninth Wave, by former RSC honcho Adrian Noble – is an object lesson in sustained rapture. No less a highlight than it is on the record, Somewhere In Between sees its creator transported by the power of her own song and, in doing so, transports you to the fleeting magic-hour reverie it celebrates. There is also a new song, Tawny Moon, for which McIntosh confidently takes centre stage and climaxes by effectively acting as ringmaster to the huge full moon rising from the back of the stage.

Few musicians are more adept at conveying a sense that something good is going to happen than Kate Bush. We know what Nocturn sounds like on record, so a certain sense of expectation is unavoidable. On either side of the stage, we see arrows fired from bows into the firmament, where they turn into birds. For reasons I couldn’t honestly fathom, we see the painter’s model sacrificing a seagull to no discernible end. Over a rising funk that defies physical resistance, Bush makes a break for transcendence and effectively brings us with her: “We stand in the Atlantic/We become panoramic,” she sings, with arms aloft. Like the rest of the band, guitarist David Rhodes has donned bird mask. As Bush is presented with vast black wings, she and Rhodes circle elegantly around each other, before finally, briefly, she takes flight.

Just two songs by way of an encore – which, after what has preceded them, seems generous: Among Angels from 2011’s Fifty Words For Snow is performed solo at the piano, before the entire band return for Cloudbusting. Once again, we’re reminded that, almost uniquely among her peers, Kate Bush goes to extraordinary lengths in search of subjects that hold up that magic of living up to the light for just long enough to think that we can reach it. But, like the beaming 56 year-old mother singing, “The sun’s coming out”, that too dissipates into memory. And, after another 19 performances, what will happen? In another 35 years, Kate Bush will be 91. Even if she’s still here, we might not be. Perhaps that’s why tonight, she gave us everything she had. And somehow, either in spite or because of that, we still didn’t want to let her go.
avatar
benjicoq

Messages : 279
Date d'inscription : 02/06/2014

Revenir en haut Aller en bas

Re: After the Dawn

Message  Renaud le Mar 2 Sep - 11:47

Toutes ces excellentes chroniques, cela va devenir lassant à la longue.....lol!
Personne n'a trouvé de critique assassine ? Suspect

_________________
This will be my monument, this will be your beacon when I'm gone...

avatar
Renaud

Messages : 790
Date de naissance : 24/09/1964
Date d'inscription : 29/05/2014
Localisation : Rouen

Revenir en haut Aller en bas

Re: After the Dawn

Message  MarcO le Mar 2 Sep - 14:11

Quelques (mauvaises) photos prises pendant le spectacle (c'est pas bien ça !!)







Il est bien loin le temps des justaucorps et de la tenue sexy de Babooshka ! !
(C'est vrai qu'en général on gonfle avec l'âge et je n'y échappe pas. Donc pas de moquerie !!)

Y a-t-il un moyen pour que les photos, ou les vidéos, que l'on insère sous forme de liens, restent affichées même si elles sont supprimées de leur sites d'origine ?
avatar
MarcO

Messages : 61
Date d'inscription : 31/05/2014

Revenir en haut Aller en bas

Re: After the Dawn

Message  Renaud le Mar 2 Sep - 14:48

Je ne sais pas si cela a déjà été posté ici, je n'en ai pas le souvenir, mais la chanson inédite interprétée par Bertie dans la suite Sky of Honey s'intitule "Tawny Moon".
Tawny désigne une teinte "fauve", je suppose que l'on pourrait traduire par lune rousse.

_________________
This will be my monument, this will be your beacon when I'm gone...

avatar
Renaud

Messages : 790
Date de naissance : 24/09/1964
Date d'inscription : 29/05/2014
Localisation : Rouen

Revenir en haut Aller en bas

Re: After the Dawn

Message  Jean-Marc le Mar 2 Sep - 16:16

Allez...
Je ne vais pas faire de CR, d'autres m'ont précédé et bien...
Juste une relevé d'impressions.

Tout d'abord, bien brieffé par Emma et Renaud : "Laisse faire les choses... Fais confiance à Mémère".
Je crois que l'impression de Pierre a joué sur les recommandations.
Effectivement, je n'aurais jamais imaginé un démarrage de la sorte avec "Lilly".
Cette partie pop m'a quand même bluffé!
Malgré tout, elle aurait continué comme ça toute la 1ère partie, ben je n'aurais pas été déçu.
C'était chouette, enlevé, gai, bien torché. La mise en lumière m'a plu.
Ca m'a mis une banane! Kate souriante, contente d'être là, elle m'a fait presque rire 2 ou 3 fois (je revois Emma me regarder en se disant : pourquoi il rit?)
Bertie et son rythme dans la peau... J'adooore!
Alors oui, le choix des titres surtout TOTC et Joanni! Mais ça passe vachement bien.
Je ne boude pas mon plaisir.
Démarre TNW et je reste dans les airs pendant toute la durée.
Si j'ai envie de faire la fine bouche, j'aurais aimé que pendant ADOS (ça fait bizarre comme ça) elle soit en plus sur scène au piano (je guettais dans la pénobre).
Si elle avait fait ça, j'aurais pleuré...
La 1ère parte s'achève, ça fait du bien une pause. Ca fait baisser la tension et l'envie de la suite remont : je me dis "il en reste auant à voir". Youpi!
Et hop ASOH, moins fort mais superbe. Bien sûr le solo de Bertie... Pas essentiel, il n'a pas une super voix mais c'est pas grave.
Si j'ai une frustration c'est un rappel avec 2 ou 3 titres solos piano en plus, afin qu'elle me donne le coup de grâce!
Le final "Cloudsbusting"... Je veux que ça dure... Ca dure....

On retrouve David et son copain dehors, je serais resté des heures tous ensembles à échanger...

Je n'en reviens pas, cette soirée tourne et retourne dans ma tête...
Je vous aime tous et avoir partager ce moment c'est...

Mémère a créé un tel manque que l'on aurait tous voulu plein de choses dans ce concert : un piano/voix, un concert échevelé avec plein de titres de TD.
On ne peut pas être rassasiés!!!
avatar
Jean-Marc

Messages : 933
Date de naissance : 25/12/1966
Date d'inscription : 29/05/2014
Localisation : Bordeaux-Mérignac

Revenir en haut Aller en bas

Re: After the Dawn

Message  Renaud le Mar 2 Sep - 16:33

Jean-Marc a écrit:
Je n'en reviens pas, cette soirée tourne et retourne dans ma tête...

Je crois que tu n'es pas le seul !!!

_________________
This will be my monument, this will be your beacon when I'm gone...

avatar
Renaud

Messages : 790
Date de naissance : 24/09/1964
Date d'inscription : 29/05/2014
Localisation : Rouen

Revenir en haut Aller en bas

Re: After the Dawn

Message  Lucy Dreams le Mar 2 Sep - 18:00

J'en rêve encore...
avatar
Lucy Dreams

Messages : 142
Date d'inscription : 16/08/2014

Revenir en haut Aller en bas

Re: After the Dawn

Message  benjicoq le Mar 2 Sep - 19:04

Renaud a écrit:Toutes ces excellentes chroniques, cela va devenir lassant à la longue.....lol!
Personne n'a trouvé de critique assassine ? Suspect  
celle de Pierre
avatar
benjicoq

Messages : 279
Date d'inscription : 02/06/2014

Revenir en haut Aller en bas

Re: After the Dawn

Message  Lucy Dreams le Mar 2 Sep - 19:15

benjicoq a écrit:
Renaud a écrit:Toutes ces excellentes chroniques, cela va devenir lassant à la longue.....lol!
Personne n'a trouvé de critique assassine ? Suspect  
celle de Pierre
Laughing
avatar
Lucy Dreams

Messages : 142
Date d'inscription : 16/08/2014

Revenir en haut Aller en bas

Re: After the Dawn

Message  Emma le Mar 2 Sep - 22:21

Renaud a écrit:
Jean-Marc a écrit:
Je n'en reviens pas, cette soirée tourne et retourne dans ma tête...

Je crois que tu n'es pas le seul !!!

Moi j'étais à fond dedans aujourd'hui et il y en avait besoin Rolling Eyes
avatar
Emma

Messages : 808
Date de naissance : 26/07/1964
Date d'inscription : 30/05/2014
Localisation : Paris

Revenir en haut Aller en bas

Re: After the Dawn

Message  alfontaine le Mar 2 Sep - 23:30

Un choc d'abord: Lily, l'intro la plus cinématographique comme révélée par la Peter's cut Wink , quand je l'ai raconté à Damien il a même dit, je le cite:
C'est le plus fort ce Pierre!
Franchement, après nous en avoir parlé pour ton director's cut, j'en avais rêvé pour le spectacle alors...le choc mardi dernier. (mais je n'ai peut-être pas tout suivi: Lucie semble aussi très inspirée par Lily d'après Emma?)

Sa voix avec des retours de puissance d'avant 2005 (A ce sujet il faudrait peut-être savoir le rôle en direct de Stephen Tayler derrière les manettes vu ses sous-entendus facebook mais bon, on s'en fout un peu.) Bizarrement le premier jour ce sont les passages plus soft dans la première partie qui me semblait légèrement faux. Un peu d'appréhension, une légère fragilité mais très bien maîtrisée. Comme vous dites un peu tous, c'est encore plus beau.

La surprise des choix comme tout le monde mais après réflexion pas tant que ça surpris: Lily pour la protection, comme un mantra, le bindi le premier soir(j'y connais pas grand chose mais Lulu nous en parlera mieux je pense si elle a le temps); Hounds of Love toujours l'évocation de cette peur de l'enfance mélée à de l'excitation mais dans une explosion de joie et d'amour, un chanson que Kate a toujours beaucoup aimée d'après ce qu'elle dit (du coups pas de The Fog, Coral Room, moments of pleasure trop remuantes peut-être pour la Kate de ce retour), Joanni, une autre de ses gardiennes est convoquée et dont la beauté m'a été révélée au spectacle (encore une chanson avec laquelle Pierre semble avoir été connectée avant le spectacle ). Les cloches de Rouen m'avaient plus fait anticiper un Sensual World qu'un KOTM suivi d'un TNW.
A ce sujet quand Mino Cinelu, ce joyeux shaman a actionné son lasso aborigène (c'est bien l'instrument de musique des australiens pour entrer dans le monde des rêves,non? Me trompe-je?) j'ai bien cru qu'on allait enfin avoir droit à un peu de The Dreaming puis Shocked  puis  cheers
Mais en fait, là aussi, après avoir repensé à ce que tu as dis Pierre sur l'apaisement post Aerial de 2005 qui contraste tant avec The Dreaming: trop de choses perturbantes sont convoquées dans The Dreaming pour la Kate sur scène. Pourtant The Ninth Wave c'est pourtant pas anodin au niveau de la perturbation: ça reste un grand paradoxe pour moi. Peut-être que TNW est plus un jeu à se faire peur pour Kate, (mais pas pour nous: les sentiments provoqués sont très profonds; elle y maîtriserait son art de l'évocation, n'en serait pas l'objet comme dans TD) un jeu de miroirs à la Dame de Shalott.  Peut-être que TD, TSW et TRS remuent trop de sentiments négatifs pour Kate ?

Par contre je n'ai aucune idée pourquoi rien de NFE ? Parce qu'il n'y a pas de chanson protectrices dedans? Pourtant...
Comme certains j'ai été surpris aussi par la noirceur de the Sky of Honey, certes ponctuelle mais qui ne ressort absolument pas à son écoute seule. Pour moi on a tenté de le métamorphoser, de lui donner des aspérités par la mise en scène mais il m'a manqué quelque chose (même dans Sunset) que je n'arrive pas à identifier, une danse soufi à la Wow ?  Smile  Smile . En tout cas pour le 26.
Oui je sais: je fais mon difficile mais après TNW et l'euphorie décuplée par ma croyance en l'émergence possible de TD et TSW ou même 50WFS évoqué par le monde d'origine du pantin derrière la porte, m'ont tracassés. L'Artémis de la pochette de RUTH, la mort du merle, l'attitude violente du pantin (qui est un peu comme pour nous convoquer, nous matérialiser sur scène entre autres, non? ) m'ont empéché de rentrer dans l'aspect méditatif ou hypnotique de SOH

Il me faudrait le revoir, un mélange très contrasté de sentiments contradictoires m'envahit aussi: délicieux et légèrement gênant. Des espoirs fous aussitôt déçus mais consolés par des diamants musicaux et visuels.
Et aussi j'étais loin, très loin et ça ce fut pour une partie du désagrément. Among Angels nous a fait entrevoir que quand Kate comble un manque elle crée ensuite un gouffre d'attente encore plus fort. Cloudbusting  en communion avec le public ne pouvait suffire. Une vidéo pour me consoler Mother Bush, please.
avatar
alfontaine

Messages : 324
Date de naissance : 02/10/1972
Date d'inscription : 01/06/2014
Localisation : Gard

Revenir en haut Aller en bas

Re: After the Dawn

Message  Emma le Mer 3 Sep - 8:31

Bon, depuis la récupération du boot du 27 ce  we, j'ai un peu de mal à m'en défaire ...

La 1ère partie est très loin d'être anodine... Elle pourrait être introduite dans un test de QI Laughing

1- director's cut - Lily
2- HOL (face A du premier tableau TNW...
3- Arial Joanni (Disque 1 du second tableau Sky of honey)

.... Et la série recommence une seconde fois
1-director's cut - Toc
2- HOL RUTH
3- Aerial- KOTM....

Comme d'habitude sur toute la discographie de Mémère, chacun peut y aller de son interprétation...
Mais si je rejoins un peu  Alain pour le thème de la protection... J'aurais tendance à ajouter que c'est le besoin de cette dernière pour se donner le courage d'y aller...
Mémère écoute les voix pour aller à la bataille, car elle n'y serait jamais allée toute seule Laughing
Il y a les encouragements des voix pour se donner la force nécessaire pour nous affronter.
Sommes-nous des monstres dans son esprit?
Beaucoup questions de combats dans cette première partie... Et beaucoup d'amour aussi.

Et comme le King dans KOTM, elle sort de sa cachette, on la croyait morte... Pas du tout elle revient en force.. Et pan Tableau 1...
C'était ma pensée du matin.

Excellente journée à tous...
avatar
Emma

Messages : 808
Date de naissance : 26/07/1964
Date d'inscription : 30/05/2014
Localisation : Paris

Revenir en haut Aller en bas

Re: After the Dawn

Message  Renaud le Mer 3 Sep - 9:26

Ton analyse me semble tout à fait pertinente Emma !

Et je pense que le choix d' Among Angels en rappel n'est pas dû au hasard :
"I can see angels around you.....
There's someone who's loved you forever but you don't know it.
You might feel it and just not show it."

Une belle déclaration d'amour aussi non ?

_________________
This will be my monument, this will be your beacon when I'm gone...

avatar
Renaud

Messages : 790
Date de naissance : 24/09/1964
Date d'inscription : 29/05/2014
Localisation : Rouen

Revenir en haut Aller en bas

Re: After the Dawn

Message  Renaud le Mer 3 Sep - 9:40

National Post (Canada)

Kate Bush’s return at the Hammersmith Appolo reveals the singer still has that the esoteric magic.
Thirty-five years after her last tour, Kate Bush could have been forgiven for treading gingerly back onstage. But if she did anything by half-measures, she wouldn’t be Kate Bush. Before the Dawn, her 22-show residency at the Hammersmith Apollo, which will run until Oct. 1, is a three-act, three-hour mix of high-concept theatre and gut-punching pop, wizardly tech and puppetry, studio-based film and live action.

This last element, of course, is key — from the time she sashayed barefoot onstage on the second night of her run, whose more than 80,000 tickets had sold out in 15 minutes, her fans were primed to cheer as if all their Christmases had come at once.

Bush’s live return had seemed a pipe dream for so long that her impersonators — one of whom was busking outside the venue as the queue snaked in — could believe they’d cornered the market.

Her 1979 Tour of Life, which whirled through Europe just before her 21st birthday, involved high-octane dancing and 17 costume changes; its exigencies and Bush’s perfectionism, coupled with the death of a lighting engineer during rehearsals, were said to have discouraged her for good. But even as her albums became more sporadic — 12 years separated The Red Shoes (1993) from Aerial (2005) — she’d occasionally muse about performing again. She writes in Before the Dawn’s program that her “chief consultant,” her 16-year-old son, Bertie McIntosh, was the true catalyst.

Bertie, with his resonant tenor and endearingly awkward dance moves, was part of a five-person backing vocal team during an opening set that found his mother in conventional rock-band mode — or at least as conventional as a singer who writes about occult ritual magic (“Lily”) and undead Elvis (“King of the Mountain”) can get. The Kate Bush who in 1978 swooped on the scene as a knowing sylph with “Wuthering Heights” has matured into a confident earth mother, and her movements now are leisurely, her hand gestures welcoming like a preacher who’s set aside fire and brimstone. Her voice has lowered too from its banshee-like heights, and where once her music thrived on urgency — as on 1982’s thrillingly eerie The Dreaming (1982) — it has settled into more stretched-out grooves.

Bush ignored her material from before Hounds of Love (1985) all night, and at moments, the busy mid-tempo beats supplied by Miles Davis associates Omar Hakim (drums) and Mino Cinelu (percussion) verged on bombast. Yet sometimes, as on “Running Up that Hill,” their intensity outdid the records.

Then, as Cinelu whirled a large bullroarer, confetti guns sprayed out pieces of paper bearing a quote from Tennyson and signifying the start of her concept suite The Ninth Wave, the second side of Hounds of Love. The stage was redecorated as sunken ruins for the tale of a shipwrecked woman in danger of drowning, and Bush appeared on film up above, singing with a life jacket. (Still willing to suffer for her art, she’d recorded this part in a flotation tank, where she got hypothermia.)

From here, the show became seriously strange, with actors wearing fish-skeleton costumes, a set-within-a-set depicting a teetering living room where Bush appeared as a ghost, billowing sheets and lasers evoking waves, a lighting rig impersonating a helicopter as it strafed the crowd with smoke and searchlights, and new dialogue by Cloud Atlas author David Mitchell that lent warmth, humour, and a little pathos to a decidedly chilly tale.

Bush could likely have satisfied most punters if she’d quit there, but after an interval she delivered Aerial’s suite, A Sky of Honey, a more abstract narrative about art, whose rhythms evolve from the placid to the magisterial. It featured the Pinocchio-like metamorphosis of a life-sized marionette with whom Bush danced before turning into a blackbird (as one does). Bertie, kitted out as an early-20th-century painter, was featured in the evening’s only new song, “Tawny Moon.” If it was a little hammy, well, so were his mother’s earliest videos; his impressive vocal range further proved his good genes.

Indeed, Kate Bush’s voice — commanding, coaxing, cooing and coiling itself around her audience — carried the show; the encore’s piano-and-vocals song “Among Angels” proved devastating in its simplicity. At times during Before the Dawn, one wondered what the younger, more febrile Bush would have done — The Ninth Wave’s careeningly folky “Jig of Life,” could have done with a real violin and pipes, and some truly vertiginous staging — but the 2014 Bush projects such depth of feeling that cavils seem grouchy.

It’s a delight to see and hear Bush’s singular vision in person — especially without one’s neighbours’ screens in the way, as the crowd respected her wishes to pocket their cellphones. They’ll have memories not of illusion, but of magic.

_________________
This will be my monument, this will be your beacon when I'm gone...

avatar
Renaud

Messages : 790
Date de naissance : 24/09/1964
Date d'inscription : 29/05/2014
Localisation : Rouen

Revenir en haut Aller en bas

Re: After the Dawn

Message  Pierre le Mer 3 Sep - 17:21

Un bootleg (320 kbps) du concert du 29 en circulation... En cours de téléchargement, donc pas encore écouté... Je vous tiens au courant.

Je suis en train d'écouter de nouveau celui du 27 en lossless sur ma chaîne: qualité générale plus qu'acceptable à part qqs disparités d'intensité du son selon les morceaux (mais pas au sein d'un seul morceau). C'est une expérience intéressante d'écouter l'ensemble sans le visualiser, certaines images ou détails me reviennent, d'autres pas. Confirmation que la première partie m'a vraiment déplue, que ce soit pour la set-list, la voix (très anodine) et l'interprétation instrumentale. C'est d'une banalité confondante d'après les standards bushiens.
Beaucoup de supports enregistrés d'avance pour la partie "The Ninth Wave". De façon générale, je n'aime pas trop ce que fait le batteur (très frîme, pas de subtilité) malgré sa compétence évidente. Je crois-a-priori- que la partie "A Sky of Honey" est la plus réussie au niveau de l'interprétation (elle et musicalement).
De façon globale, je ne ressens pas de bouleversement émotionnel, sauf pour "The Morning Fog" et "Aerial Tal" (supérieure à la version studio! L'ambiance est vraiment étrange!), "Prologue" est très bien aussi. La première partie de "Sunset" (sans piano) m'emmerde assez, c'est lourd et ennuyeux et je ne vois pas l'intérêt de l'accordéon, mais dès que le flamenco refait son apparition, tout revient dans l'ordre (guitare et percus fantastiques!)... La nouvelle chanson chantée par Bertie (sa voix est vraiment désagréable!) est inutile et anodine. Même "Among Angels" que j'adore me paraît très inférieure à l'enregistrement studio, aussi bien pour la voix que le jeu de piano (toucher sans nuance). Elle m'émeut beaucoup moins.

_________________
The sight of bridges and balloons makes calm canaries irritable

avatar
Pierre
Admin

Messages : 1385
Date de naissance : 30/08/1962
Date d'inscription : 29/05/2014
Localisation : Paris 14

Revenir en haut Aller en bas

Re: After the Dawn

Message  Jean-Marc le Mer 3 Sep - 17:52

Pour ceux qui auraient envie de découper les pages du programme sans oser de peur de l'abimer...
Pas la peine de le faire.
J'ai testé pour vous, cela n'apporte rien.
Je n'ai pas pu résister au cas où il y aurait une pépite Crying or Very sad
avatar
Jean-Marc

Messages : 933
Date de naissance : 25/12/1966
Date d'inscription : 29/05/2014
Localisation : Bordeaux-Mérignac

Revenir en haut Aller en bas

Re: After the Dawn

Message  benjicoq le Mer 3 Sep - 20:37

j'avais une demi heure a tuer, j'ai fait ça tout a l'heure Very Happy
http://nsa33.casimages.com/img/2014/09/03/140903011405342798.jpg

EDIT: Benji, merci de penser aux petits écrans... J'ai l'impression de radoter. Wink
avatar
benjicoq

Messages : 279
Date d'inscription : 02/06/2014

Revenir en haut Aller en bas

Re: After the Dawn

Message  MarcO le Mer 3 Sep - 21:35

Jean-Marc a écrit:Pour ceux qui auraient envie de découper les pages du programme sans oser de peur de l'abimer...
Pas la peine de le faire.
J'ai testé pour vous, cela n'apporte rien.
Je n'ai pas pu résister au cas où il y aurait une pépite Crying or Very sad

Mais pourquoi le découper ? Et à quoi il ressemble en fait ? Je n'ai pu voir que la photo de couverture.
avatar
MarcO

Messages : 61
Date d'inscription : 31/05/2014

Revenir en haut Aller en bas

Re: After the Dawn

Message  Jean-Marc le Mer 3 Sep - 21:56

En fait, il y a des pages qui sont attachées sur le bord extérieur.
En les écratant un peu, on voit qu'elles sont imprimées à l'intérieur et sur certaines on devine du texte...
avatar
Jean-Marc

Messages : 933
Date de naissance : 25/12/1966
Date d'inscription : 29/05/2014
Localisation : Bordeaux-Mérignac

Revenir en haut Aller en bas

Re: After the Dawn

Message  MarcO le Jeu 4 Sep - 9:57

Ça y est, j'ai vu ce que ça donne grâce au lien que Pierre à mis dans un message dans le sujet consacré à Before the Dawn. Il a l'air bien joli ce programme !
avatar
MarcO

Messages : 61
Date d'inscription : 31/05/2014

Revenir en haut Aller en bas

Re: After the Dawn

Message  Contenu sponsorisé


Contenu sponsorisé


Revenir en haut Aller en bas

Page 3 sur 12 Précédent  1, 2, 3, 4 ... 10, 11, 12  Suivant

Voir le sujet précédent Voir le sujet suivant Revenir en haut

- Sujets similaires

 
Permission de ce forum:
Vous ne pouvez pas répondre aux sujets dans ce forum