"The Kick Inside" 40 ans... Déjà!

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Re: "The Kick Inside" 40 ans... Déjà!

Message  Pierre le Ven 16 Mar - 7:12

Sur le site du "Financial Times", en podcast, une petite conversation à 3, plutôt bien documentée, autour de "Wuthering Heights", dans le cadre d'une idée plutôt intéressante, "Life of a song", qui se propose d'analyser une chanson et voir ses répercussions dans le temps. Dans la série, il y en a d'autres, comme le "Strange Fruit" de Billie Holiday... C'est assez bien fichu.

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Re: "The Kick Inside" 40 ans... Déjà!

Message  Pierre le Ven 16 Mar - 17:22

Encore un article, irlandais cette fois, sur le site du Belfast Telegraph, avec une playlist commentée pas très originale, avec "WH" en N°1:

Kate Bush: The enduring fascination of this woman’s work over four decades

Forty years ago this month, Abba's Take a Chance on Me, was knocked off the Number 1 spot by a teenager's self-penned tribute to an Emily Bronte novel. Graeme Ross chooses this and nine other classics in his playlist of favourite Kate Bush songs

It's one of those jarring, stop-you-in-your-track moments when you suddenly realise that a memory or an event of some kind that is still fresh in your mind actually happened rather a long time ago. And that was certainly the case for me when the penny dropped recently that it is now exactly 40 years since Kate Bush exploded onto the music scene and the nation's consciousness with her unforgettable debut single, Wuthering Heights.

Seemingly from nowhere, a rather eccentric 19-year-old girl with a squealing, high-pitched voice entranced the nation and transcended the prevailing musical trends of punk and disco with a song based on a classic novel from the 1840s that most who bought the record would never have read (indeed Bush herself only read the novel after she had written the song).

Wuthering Heights spent four weeks in March and April of 1978 at number 1, launching Bush's celebrated career as one of the most imaginative musical auteurs of the rock era, a career that has produced some challenging, eccentric, but brilliant music with Bush effortlessly balancing the fine high-wire act between art and pretension.

A child prodigy born into a musical family, Bush was discovered and mentored by Pink Floyd's Dave Gilmour and signed to EMI aged 16 with a large cache of songs already written. It was evident from the beginning that this was a unique talent, and EMI nurtured Bush, allowing her to develop until her first album The Kick Inside - containing many of her stockpile of songs, Wuthering Heights included - was released in January 1978.

With every subsequent release it became clear that Bush liked to do things on her own terms and brooked no boundaries for her songs. By her fourth album she was self-producing and was in complete command of her own career.

She had studied mime and dance and this led to a series of lavish, pioneering music videos that luminously illustrating her songs. In the decades since Wuthering Heights, Kate Bush has beguiled, perplexed and fascinated so many of us with her unique, visionary art. She has hardly been prolific, just 10 studio albums over those four decades, but this woman's work is enduring, important and hugely influential, with every increasingly rare release greatly anticipated.

Famously, Bush had only toured once at the very outset of her career until the 2014 Before the Dawn tour, universally lauded as a triumph and, along with her most recent studio album, 2011's 50 Words For Snow, only her second of new material since 1992, demonstrated that this most innovative of artists had lost none of her unique lyrical, musical and conceptual powers.

To celebrate the 40th anniversary of Wuthering Heights and Kate's imminent 60th birthday (another stop-you-in-your-tracks realisation), here is my list of Kate Bush's 10 greatest songs.

10. Misty (From 50 Words for Snow, 2011)

A young girl builds a snowman which comes alive and visits her at night. It's a familiar story, but Raymond Briggs was never like this. Over a stately 13-and-a-bit minutes, Bush weaves a spare, piano-led, erotic tapestry that, as in Briggs' fantasy, can only end one way. More than 30 years after she first rose to fame with Wuthering Heights, Kate Bush proved with 50 Words for Snow, her last studio album to date, that she was still a singular talent. In other hands, Misty would have been an absurd premise, but, with a dream rhythm section in ace session drummer Steve Gadd and double bass legend Danny Thompson, lush but never intrusive orchestration and Bush's deep, husky vocals, Misty is a fantastical experience, as challenging and ambitious as any of her finest works.

9. Breathing (Never for Ever, 1980)

Kate adopts the persona of a foetus fearful of being born in the midst of a nuclear holocaust. With the Cold War intensifying, this was a pertinent, typically ambitious, risk-taking song and a highly unlikely hit single from Bush as she conjured yet another startlingly unique performance.

8. This Woman's Work (The Sensual World, 1989)

"This woman's world/Ooh, it's hard on the man/Now his part is over/Now starts the craft of the father", Bush sings tenderly at the outset of an incredibly moving performance. More evidence of that wonderful Bush empathy and humanity on a song written specifically for the soundtrack of the 1988 movie She's Having a Baby. This time it's the expectant father, whose wife's and unborn baby's lives are in danger, who is the object of Bush's compassion. Bush recut the song for 2011's Director's Cut album with her 13-year-old son Bertie's angelic chorister-like vocals a particular highlight.

7. Army Dreamers (Never for Ever, 1980)

Behind the childlike vocals and the mandolin-led waltz melody lies a powerful anti-war message as Bush laments the waste of young, unfulfilled lives ("He never even made it to his twenties") in the form of a mother mourning her dead soldier son. Time hasn't diminished its impact and resonance and Army Dreamers remains a song for all ages and all wars.

6. Running Up That Hill (A Deal with God) (Hounds of Love, 1985)

Beginning with 1982's The Dreaming, Bush began to self-produce and had also constructed her own recording studio at her country home. She had also mastered the Fairlight CMI synthesizer, one of the first sampling machines, and all this resulted in complete artistic freedom and a blossoming of her unique talents. The result was the Hounds of Love album, the peak of her creative and commercial success. Four hit singles, all making good use of the Fairlight and backed by stunning videos, emerged from the album, the first of which was Running Up That Hill, her biggest hit since Wuthering Heights. Complex, adventurous and more mature vocally with a memorable drum track, Running Up That Hill relates to the song's two lovers swapping genders to experience the other's emotions and understand one another better - the deal with God of the subtitle.

5. The Man with the Child in His Eyes (The Kick Inside, 1978)

The maturity and grace of the follow-up to Wuthering Heights erased any lingering suspicions that Kate Bush was a one-novelty-hit wonder. Composed when Bush was just 13, The Man with the Child in His Eyes is an achingly romantic, hugely affecting ballad, its simplicity in direct contrast to the pomp and circumstance of her debut single. Contrary to speculation, it probably wasn't about one man in particular, more likely being an early example of Bush's intrinsic perception and observation. Bush herself has claimed that the song was about how men in general seemed to her to hold on to the little boy inside them.

4. Cloudbusting (Hounds of Love, 1985)

Stunning in conception and realisation, Cloudbusting, based on the loving relationship between unconventional psychoanalyst Wilhelm Reich - who was imprisoned in the USA in the 1950s after conducting rain-making experiments with a "cloudbusting" machine - and his young son, really is an amazing, magical record. Bush masterfully conveys the boy's innocence and wonder, not just on the record but in the groundbreaking video that accompanied the hit single in which she played the son.

3. Hounds of Love (Hounds of Love, 1985)

The title track from Bush's magnum opus draws on the classic 1957 Jacques Tourneur horror film Night of the Demon for its "It's in the trees ... it's coming!" sample at the beginning of the song and is full of vivid imagery with love taking the form of hounds. Beware the hounds of love, says Bush, they will rip you to shreds, but courage, courage. With a stentorian drum track imitating the pulsing of the heart, Hounds of Love is about fearing to commit when love comes calling and the inevitability that when it does, you are powerless to resist.

2. Moments of Pleasure (The Red Shoes, 1993)

Beautifully revisited on 2011's Director's Cut, this is one of Bush's most personal and moving songs on which she remembers friends and family who have passed on and in doing so, she allows the listener rare access to her own past and inner circle. Life is sometimes a hard gig, Bush says, and it is remembering fleeting moments from the past - like lying on a beach with a loved one, or a quirky little saying of her mother's - that smooth the ride. But it never seems intrusive and the listener is encouraged to make their own moments of pleasure for their loved ones to remember in this life-affirming masterpiece.

1. Wuthering Heights (The Kick Inside, 1978)

In a year when Scotland's World Cup song, Ally's Tartan Army, The Smurfs and the Brighouse and Rastrick Brass Band challenged the domination of punk, disco and the Grease movie soundtrack, Wuthering Heights was dismissed in some quarters as a novelty hit. How ridiculous that assessment looks now. But there is no doubt Kate Bush's haunting epic was unlike anything ever heard before. Famously, Bush had never read Emily Bronte's novel before composing the song, based on a brief glimpse of a BBC adaptation when she was a child, but the portents were there. She had been christened Catherine and the book's heroine was called Catherine Earnshaw; even more bizarrely, Kate shared a birthday with Bronte. Hugely theatrical, Wuthering Heights almost never made it as the lead-off single from her debut album as Bush, displaying what would become her trademark single-mindedness, had to fight EMI for its release. When she performed it on Top of the Pops, Bush later described her performance as "watching herself die", but the instant impact of Wuthering Heights, with its highly original subject matter and distinctive musical treatment along with the otherworldly quality of Bush's remarkable four-octave voice, set Kate Bush apart as a uniquely individual artist who has continued to follow a fearless and uncharted path.

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Re: "The Kick Inside" 40 ans... Déjà!

Message  Pierre le Dim 25 Mar - 14:46

Je suis rentré ce matin d'une soirée chez un ami d'Argenteuil (la banlieue, la vraie!), et lors de mon retour dans le train, cette situation dans laquelle on porte un regard sur tout un tas de choses très "réelles" (la laideur et l'odeur d'un train de banlieue, les paysages très urbains et sales qui défilent, les voyageurs qui partagent la même expérience avec leurs vies très "terre à terre"-gamins, quotidien, boulot même si c'est dimanche, situation financière au mieux très moyenne, voire précaire...),on peut constater à chaque seconde que les transports collectifs sont un manifeste assez puissant de ce que représente la réalité sociale...

Dans un premier-temps, j'avais sélectionné "Tusk" de Fleetwood Mac, album qui, pour moi, s'harmonise bien avec l'idée du voyage, une sorte de bande-son assez idéale pour l'idée du mouvement. Au bout de quelques chansons, j'ai changé d'avis et j'ai sélectionné "The Kick Inside" et là, j'ai de nouveau réalisé ce que cet album avait eu, à son époque, de magique, d'iréel mais surtout d'intemporel, on peut même dire en quelque-sorte "d'éternel" car en dehors de toute contingence réaliste, que ce soit musicalement (de façon flagrante), mais aussi concernant les textes car si la plupart s'appuient sur des situations réelles (j'exclus donc le romantisme assumé de "Wuthering Heights" et "The Kick Inside"), on réalise qu'on est face à quelqu'un qui prend le parti de transformer ces situations réelles, voire souvent banales, en quelque-chose de plus élevé (ça m'a vraiment frappé avec "Kite"!), qui prend tout son sens avec "Them Heavy People" qui finalement traite de philosophie de façon un peu triviale, presque "vulgaire"- dans le vrai sens du terme.

Et puis arrive "Room for the Life" dont je n'avais jamais vraiment saisi le sens (même si je comprenais à peu près l'idée globale dans le développement). Ce qui me posait problème, c'était "Hey there you Lady in tears, do you think that they care if they're real, woman, they just take it as part of the deal...", je m'étais toujours demandé de qui elle parlait, et je croyais qu'il s'agissait des autres femmes qui ne se posaient pas plus de questions sur leur condition, mais je sentais bien que ça ne "collait" pas... Et puis, j'ai réalisé qu'en réalité, elle parlait des hommes qui, eux, ne se posaient aucune question sur la "légitimité" de leur identité sexuelle (se sentant inconsciemment , d'une certaine façon "supérieurs" de façon naturelle). J'ai alors compris (en faveur aussi d' une conversation assez houleuse que j'ai eu hier soir avec cet ami concernant "Me too/Balance ton porc", et de façon générale le féminisme) qu'en réalité, "Room for the Life" était une chanson un peu plus polémique qu'elle n'en avait l'air et qui pourrait actuellement susciter une certaine réflexion... En gros, elle défend l'idée que tant que les femmes adopteront une attitude victimaire, face aux hommes, tout en se conformant qu'ils demandent aux femmes de jouer ("lost in your men, and the games that you play", "Night after night in the quiet house,plaiting her hair by the fire, woman, w,ith no lover to free her desire"), elles ne pourront leur prendre conscience de ce qui les rend d'une certaine façon plus fortes, et de de façon toute aussi évidente que les hommes qui se relaient sur leur propre force (physique, musculaire...). On peut penser qu'il pourrait s'agir d'une critique du féminisme qui revendique que les hommes prennent conscience qu'elles aussi peuvent être fortes, alors qu'en réalité, ce qu'elle défend, c'est que tant que les femmes se soumettront aux diktats de la séduction que les hommes attendent d'elles, qu'elles joueront le jeu qu'ils exigent d'elle (en se positionnant de fait dans un statut d'attente, de disponibilité, de passivité), elles ne pourront faire admettre leur propre force tout aussi naturelle (le pouvoir de régénérescence  de l'espèce et au-delà de ça celui de la création). Curieusement, c'est une autre forme de féminisme, mais apaisée, confiante qui part du postulat qu'en se positionnant au départ comme étant fortes, "dures" ("Like it or not, we were built tough, 'cause we're woman", "tough" étant d'ailleurs un terme la caractérisant utilisé plusieurs fois par les hommes qui ont travaillé avec elle),elles n'auront rien à prouver. Pourquoi revendiquer ce qui est évident et légitime. Mais on ne sent pas pour autant un rejet des moyens féministes, juste un appel à une forme de communautarisme qui consiste à changer d'attitude.

Voici ce qu'elle dit de "Room for the Life" dans l'excellente interview de Phil Suttcliffe dans "Sounds" à la sortie de "Never For Ever":

"People thought that song was feminist which disappointed me. It was actually saying we should go a bit easier on men because we are the ones with survival inside us, we carry the next generation, we have the will to keep going, we keep bouncing back.

"I don't know it that's anti-liberationist but I wouldn't say femininity was very strong in my songs. I've always felt there was something lacking in my feminine ... role, do I mean? Being brought up with two brothers I'd sit philosophising with them while my girlfriends wanted to talk about clothes and food. Maybe it's the male energy to be the hunter and I feel I have that in me."

'Room For The Life' portrays woman in exactly that way: 'Plaiting her hair by the fire, women/ With no lover to free her desire/ how long do you think she can stick it out/ How long do you think before she goes out, women/ Hey get up on your feet and go get it now'.

"When I'm writing . . . I've tried to explain this and people think I'm weird . . . I've been playing something for a couple of hours and I'm almost in a trance. At two or three in the morning you can actually see bits of inspiration floating about and grab them (she mimed it, like snatching at a fly). Someone comes in and says 'Hello' and I hit the calling I'm so shocked. I think in that state I'm almost split from my body and I'm not conscious of being female. Playing the piano, it's leading you too, it's the heart speaking and it's not male or female, it could be an animal, a glass, a piece of stone."


Après, on peut penser qu'elle accepte de se plier au diktat de la maternité et tout ce que ça implique, mais elle a prouvé dès le départ (et plus encore par la suite avec l'élaboration d'"Aerial") que tout en respectant ce que la nature lui commande naturellement de faire (qui ne la relègue pas pour autant à un statut inférieur), elle y trouve justement une force qui lui permet d'imposer encore davantage son indépendance et sa force. KB n'a effectivement jamais tenu un discours revendicatif, n'a jamais exclu ni sous-évalué les hommes qui l'ont accompagnée dans son parcours (bien au contraire, elle les a toujours valorisés comme source d'inspiration, et peut-être aussi quelque peu "utilisés" pour arriver à ses fins), elle a seulement gagné leur respect (ce qui n'était pas le cas au départ et assez longtemps... Les chroniqueurs anglais l'ont longtemps décrite -jusqu'à "The Dreaming"- comme "the company's(EMI) daughter", la "découverte" de Gilmour, et en France le faire-valoir de Peter Gabriel). Elle a refusé, tant que c'était en son pouvoir, d'utiliser les arguments de séduction physique (le refus d'utiliser la photo de Mankowitz comme pochette)trop flagrants ou racoleurs, en se riant de ce statut de sex-symbol dont on voulait l'affubler, en accusant l'épouse de "Baboohska" de trouver le moyen le plus sûr se "brûler les ailes" en instrumentalisant le mari, en le manipulant conséquemment à une forme de suspicion paranoïaque ne vreflétant que ses propres doutes. Elle expliqued'ailleurs très bien ce processus dans l'interview filmée de "Countdown":



Et son commentaire dans le livret de partitions "Thye Best of Kate Bush": "the games we play, boredom brings suspicion".

Bref, à l'heure de "Me Too/Balance ton porc" dont je comprends la nécessité, voire l'urgence, mais ne sais quoi penser réellement de la forme et surtout de l'efficacité, des FEMENs dont je saisis le discours et y agrée, mais désapprouve la violence et la radicalité de leurs actions (que je trouve intuitivement contre-productives), de tous ces mouvements féministes qui continuent-hélas- d'être nécessaires et justifiés dans ce qu'ils dénoncent mais dont je crains qu'ils ne provoquent chez les hommes qu'ils visent (mais aussi ceux qu'ils ne visent pas, d'où la digression autour de "Babooshka") qu'incompréhension et par la suite des réactions de violence revanchardes, de ce que le retour de Cantat sur scène peut susciter, légitimement, comme réaction viscérale, et à l'écoute d'une chanson d'une petite nana inconnue il y a 40 ans, j'ai trouvé une piste de réflexion intéressante et on ne peut plus d'actualité, un parallèle qui peut paraître "décalé", mais qui pourrait, dans les mouvements dits "féministes" apporter une piste de questionnement quant à l'attitude adéquate à avoir pour plus d'efficacité si c'est ce qui est visé... J'ai souvent considéré que le positionnement de femmes comme Elisabeth Badinter, Colette, Virginia Woolf (ces deux dernières ayant subi les aberrations d'une société machiste, ne laissant aux femmes qu'un rôle soumis et subalterne, mais contre lequel elles ont lutté en" créant" seulement) et tant d'autres était sans-doute plus "productif", efficace, car rien n'est "revendiqué" avec une violence inouïe, mais "prouvé", et ce avec la collaboration et le respect des hommes qu'elles provoquent tout naturellement, quitte à "déranger", au moins "destabiliser" momentanément. Je pense que KB fait partie de cette mouvance, et "The Kick Inside" en fut une preuve , à mon avis, flagrante.

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Re: "The Kick Inside" 40 ans... Déjà!

Message  Renaud le Jeu 26 Avr - 18:48

Je poste cette petite info ici, que l'on peut associer aux 40 ans de la sortie de Wutheirng Heights :

Kate to write poem as part of Brontë art installation in Yorkshire



Kate has agreed to contribute a piece of poetry, along with poet laureate Carol Ann Duffy, the Scottish makar, or national poet, Jackie Kay and the novelist Jeanette Winterson in a summer project celebrating the Brontë sisters. All four have been commissioned to write a piece of poetry or prose which will then be engraved on stones positioned over the eight-mile route between the sisters’ birthplace and the family parsonage between Thornton and Haworth. Winterson will celebrate the Brontë legacy as a whole, Duffy will celebrate Charlotte, Kay has Anne and Kate has Emily. The writers have been commissioned by Bradford literature festival, which will unveil the stones in July.

Kate says:

   “I am delighted to be involved in this project. Each sister being remembered by a stone in the enigmatic landscape where they lived and worked is a striking idea. Emily only wrote the one novel – an extraordinary work of art that has truly left its mark. To be asked to write a piece for Emily’s stone is an honour and, in a way, a chance to say thank you to her.”

2018 marks 200 years since the birth of Emily Brönte and 40 years since the release of Kate’s single Wuthering Heights. The stones project may possibly be the only way Kate will be marking the 40th anniversary of her song. The other three writers are confirmed to inaugurate the stones on July 7th in Bradford by reciting their words. Read more at The Guardian here.

From the event Press Release:

   BRADFORD, 26th April 2018 – Writer and musician Kate Bush, poet Carol Ann Duffy, poet and novelist Jackie Kay and novelistJeanette Winterson come together to celebrate the literary legacy of the Brontë sisters, with a new permanent multi-site public art installation set in the rugged landscape of Yorkshire, that the Brontës themselves immortalised with novels such as Jane Eyre andWuthering Heights.

   Curated and delivered by Bradford Literature Festival (29 June – 8 July 2018) and originated by writer Michael Stewart, the Brontë Stones project features four new, original works of writing, engraved onto stones in different locations connecting the Brontë sisters’ birthplace in Thornton and the Brontë family parsonage, now the Brontë Parsonage Museum, at Haworth. The captivating journey along the four points, of approximately 8 miles, form what is believed to have been the route the sisters themselves often took between the two locations.

   Of the four commissioned pieces, three of the works (by Kate Bush, Carol Ann Duffy and Jackie Kay) respond to one of the Brontë Sisters (Emily, Charlotte and Anne, respectively), while the fourth (by Jeanette Winterson) responds to the Brontë legacy as a whole.

   Accompanied by beautiful, hand drawn maps, created by Yorkshire cartographer Christopher Goddard, the stones take visitors on a journey in the footsteps of these extraordinary Yorkshire sisters, whose novels are recognised worldwide as some of the greatest works of literature to emerge from the 19th century. The project will leave a permanent memorial in the landscape that homed and fueled the imagination of these ground-breaking writers.

   The Brontë Stones will be inaugurated this year, the bicentenary of Emily Brontë, at Bradford Literature Festival in a special launch event titled The Brontë Stones: Meet the Writers. Taking place on Saturday 7 July at Bradford’s historic Midland Hotel, writer’s Carol Ann Duffy, Jackie Kay and Jeanette Winterson will be in attendance, presenting the first official readings of their new work. On Sunday 8 JulyMichael Stewart will lead visitors on a guided walking tour In the Footsteps of the Brontës taking in each of the four stones for the first time. Tickets for both the launch and walk are now on public sale at www.bradfordlitfest.co.uk.

   Following its inauguration at this year’s festival, the walk remains for members of the public to undertake for generations to come. As a legacy project, future plans include the development of a mobile app providing a personal, guided experience of the Brontë Stones walk.

   This project has been made possible by funding from Arts Council England and sponsorship from Provident Financial Group PLC.

   Kate Bush said, about Emily Bronte:

   “I am delighted to be involved in this project. Each sister being remembered by a stone in the enigmatic landscape where they lived and worked is a striking idea. Emily only wrote the one novel – an extraordinary work of art that has truly left its mark. To be asked to write a piece for Emily’s stone is an honour and, in a way, a chance to say thank you to her.”

   Jackie Kay said, about Anne Brontë:

   “It’s been a real pleasure working on the Brontë Stones project. The Brontës are part of the literary landscape of this country. The stones are exciting in that they will make the past new again, opening up along the way new paths for different readers to follow.  I particularly loved writing about Anne – she’s the most underrated writer in the family, the pioneer about whom people know the least. I liked the challenge of writing a hidden poem within the poem on the stone and working with the artist to try and achieve that effect.”

   Jeanette Winterson said, about the Brontës:

   “When I was growing up in Lancashire and roaming the hills in the rain, and feeling both passionate and misunderstood (like all teenagers, well, maybe some have better weather), I read the Brontës and felt their spirit stand by me. For me, reading is about connection – and connection that works across time too. Good books live in the present, regardless of when they were written. The Brontës showed me that hearts beat like mine, that the struggle to know who you are happens across time and generations, and gender. They showed me that writing needs the power of the personal behind it – but that somehow the story one person tells has to become a story many people can claim as their own. And the Brontës are women. As a woman I needed those ancestors, those guides. I still do.”

   Syima Aslam, director of Bradford Literature Festival, said:

   “It has been a huge privilege to curate and deliver the Brontës Stones project as part of the Festival this year. The Brontës are an integral part of the literary landscape of Bradford, and the inspiration for our annual Bronte Heritage strand of events. It is therefore an honour for Bradford Literature Festival to bring the legacy of the extraordinary Bronte sisters to life in this exciting new way. It’s a matter of great pride for us that the Stones will stand in some of the most beautiful places in the county, bearing these moving, mysterious and playful literary works, that the public can enjoy for years to come.”

   Other events related to the Brontës taking place at Bradford Literature Festival 2018 include:

       An event co-programmed with the Brontë Parsonage Museum focusing on Ann Bronte.
       A panel discussion on whether Emily Brontë was a heretic or a mystic.
       A panel discussion focusing on the Gothic elements in the work of Emily Brontë.
       A panel discussion on alternative readings of Heathcliffe from Wuthering Heights.

   Michael Stewart, project originator said:

   “I first conceived of the Brontë Stones project in October 2013. I live in Thornton and have long wanted my village to receive recognition for its place in the Brontë story. All three literary sisters and their wayward brother were born here. They were a happy family, but very shortly, after their move to Haworth in 1820, tragedy struck. First the death of their mother, then the two oldest siblings. I was also aware that Anne Brontë was buried in Scarborough many miles from the rest of her family and I wanted a stone to mark her return. It’s fantastic to see the project come to fruition.”

   Kitty Wright, Executive Director of the Brontë Society said:

   “We are thrilled to be playing a part in this exciting project and are delighted that the Anne Stone will be situated in the grounds of the Parsonage, where Anne spent almost all of her life.  Haworth and the Yorkshire landscape are of immense significance to the Brontë story and we are sure local residents and visitors will enjoy making their way along the Brontë Stone trail for years to come. We look forward to building on our partnership with Bradford Literature Festival as together we continue to celebrate the legacy of Anne and her sisters.”

Voir aussi :
http://www.bbc.com/news/entertainment-arts-43897500
https://www.theguardian.com/music/2018/apr/26/kate-bush-makes-second-tribute-to-emily-bronte-with-art-installation

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